Flex, Java/JavaFX, Silverlight, AJAX & RIA Frameworks

RIA Developer's Journal

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The first one of the seminar series "Real-World AJAX" took place on Monday, March 13, 2006 at the Marriott Marquis Times Square in New York City. More than 400 delegates -twice as many as initially projected- attended this inaugural event, with 15,000 SYS-CON.TV viewers tuning into the live simulcast. The following is the photo album of  the "Real-World AJAX" conference in New York City, March 13, 2006. Archived video presentations of this 12-hour event can be located at the conference website as well as SYS-CON.TV. Exclusive live SYS-CON.TV interviews with faculty members can be viewed here. Jeremy Geelan's SYS-CON.TV power panel participants left to right: Christophe Coenraets of Adobe, David Heinemeier Hansson of 37signals.com, Bill Scott of Yahoo!, Dion Hinchcliffe of Sphere of Influence, and Jesse James Garrett of Adaptive Path. Christophe Coenraets of Adobe an... (more)

Where Are RIA Technologies Headed in 2008?

I am always being told off by i-technologists for quoting Picasso as having said that computers are useless. But I still love his reasoning? "Because they can only give you answers." Picasso, like AJAXWorld Magazine, liked questions. So we thought we would share with you what some of the world's leading rich Internet application pioneers are thinking may be the next questions that we need to see answered. From that readers can themselves infer where AJAX is headed. What are the top questions to ask next about AJAX? Eric Miraglia of Yahoo! 1.  (From March'08) How do I calculate the ROI of building my RIA on the iPhone SDK vs using AJAX? 2.  How do I assess the performance of my app and decide what to do next to make it faster?  3.  When it comes to accessibility, how do I know what's required of me for my rich web apps?  Beyond what's required, what makes good business se... (more)

Sonoa Expands Cloud Analytics Solution

"As businesses are beginning to see more traffic through their cloud services or APIs than their browser-based applications, it is necessary to have a scalable, easy to install analytics solution for valuable business insight," said Chet Kapoor, CEO of Sonoa Systems, as his company today announced the availability of Sonoa Analytics, a powerful solution that enables business-level visibility and decision support for cloud services and APIs. Kapoor continued: "We are addressing this need and giving our customers the ability to rapidly introduce a powerful, enterprise-grade analytics solution built for 'cloud scale.'" No executive, Kapoor argues, would run a Web site without the analytics to understand and make decisions around customers, partners and investments. "APIs require the same level of visibility," he notes. In the growing API economy, Kapoor says, companies are s... (more)

RIM Releases Enhanced Java and Web Development Tools

Research In Motion (RIM) on Tuesday released updated Java and Web-based development tools for the BlackBerry platform. The BlackBerry Java Plug-In for Eclipse v1.1 and the BlackBerry Web Plug-in v2.0 offer new capabilities that make it even easier to create feature-rich applications. The BlackBerry Widget SDK (Software Development Kit) v1.0 and the BlackBerry Java SDK v5.0, which includes more than 20,000 APIs, provide unparalleled access to BlackBerry smartphone hardware features, native BlackBerry software applications and other unique system capabilities of the BlackBerry Application Platform. Using the new tools developers can quickly and easily build web-based BlackBerry Widgets or Java applications that leverage the unique benefits of the BlackBerry Application Platform to seamlessly share information across and interact with core BlackBerry applications or o... (more)

How Bad Outdated JavaScript Libraries Are for Page Load Time

Last week at Velocity we hosted a Birds of a Feather Session (BoF) and offered the attendees to analyze their web sites using dynaTrace Ajax Edition. Besides finding the typical performance problems (no cache settings, too many images, not minimized content, …) we found several sites that had one interesting problem in common: OLD VERSIONS of  JavaScript libraries such as YUI, jQuery or SPRY. Why are outdated JavaScript Libraries a problem? JavaScript libraries such as jQuery provide functions that make it easy for web developers to achieve certain things, e.g.: change the style of certain DOM elements. Most of these libraries therefore provide methods called $, $$ or find that allow finding DOM elements by ID, Tag Name, CSS Class Name or specific DOM attribute values. The following is a screenshot of the Performance Report analyzing the Boston Bruins Page on msn.fo... (more)

Google Maps! AJAX-Style Web Development Using ASP.NET

In the past few months, the design pattern of combining Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) to develop highly interactive Web applications has been growing in popularity. High-profile Web applications such as Google Maps and A9 are currently leveraging the combination of these technologies to produce rich client-side user experiences. The individual technologies that compose AJAX are not recent developments; they have been around for some time and have been continuously updated and improved. However, it is the recent confluence of these technologies that is leading to interesting possibilities. I have three goals in this article. First, I want to provide a high-level overview of AJAX-style applications. My second goal is to provide a detailed description of asynchronous callback features of ASP.NET 2.0. Finally, I want to provide an insight into upcoming enhance... (more)

What Is AJAX?

(October 7, 2005) - AJAX isn't a technology, or a language, and there's no recipe to implement it; it's just a combination of various components to achieve something you otherwise couldn't: asynchronous http requests. However, since early 2005, when Google and Flickr popularized the concept, its use has grown rapidly. The name AJAX is short for Asynchronous JavaScript and XML. It uses the JavaScript XMLHttpRequest function to create a tunnel from the client's browser to the server and transmit information back and forth without having to refresh the page. The data travels in XML format because it transmits complex data types over clear text. AJAX uses XHTML for the data presentation of the view layer, DOM, short for Document Object Model, which dynamically manipulates the presentation, XML for data exchange, and XMLHttpRequest as the exchange engine that ties every... (more)

Google Maps and ASP.NET

I am sure that most of you have heard about or have had a chance to use Google Maps. It's a great service and I was really impressed by the responsiveness of the application and the ease with which users could drag and zoom maps from a Web browser. It has in many ways heralded the arrival of AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML), which I am sure will revitalize Web development in the days to come. What makes the service even better is the availability of the Google Maps API (Application Programming Interface) as a free Beta service. The API allows developers to embed Google Maps in their custom applications. It also allows them to overlay information on the map and customize the map to their needs. As I write this article there are quite a few sites that utilize Google Maps, and more and more of them are appearing by the day. The API by itself is pretty straightfor... (more)

One More Move, and the Monkey Gets It!

function PopUp01(URL) { day = new Date(); id = day.getTime(); eval("page" + id + " = window.open(URL, '" + id + "', 'toolbar=0,scrollbars=1,location=0,status=0,menubar=0,resizable=0,directories=0,hotkeys=0,width=1160,height=880');"); } Why is this monkey in danger? I've been having more fun than a person should have over the past few months with Web 2.0, and you’re going to get a kick out of what I've been doing. Especially since it involves the impending death of a beloved Web mascot. First I must confess that I'm a slime-sucking weasel. No, not the kind you meet in your lawyer's office. The kind that invents things and protects them with IP law. Some of the material I'm going to cover I have protected. If you have any questions, feel free to email me. I thought about being a better person and giving away everything I have, but I lost my last billion do... (more)

Designing ColdFusion Applications With UML

Have you ever watched actors improvise? It's quite fun; you never know what's going to happen. But imagine if a movie director decided a script wasn't necessary at all. After all, the actors know the plot and know the most about their characters, so why not let them improvise. Wouldn't this lead to a more creative and realistic movie? I think we can all see that this would simply lead to a confusing story with no consistency. The actors are expected to impose their own talents on their roles, but they need a script to guide them along. Developers are no different, yet I see "improv developing" all the time. A project manager will just describe what's needed - the outlines of a plot - and let the developers work it out. The results are often what you'd see with a movie. However, designing an application with UML can act as a script for developers. They're still free ... (more)

Who Are The All-Time Heroes of i-Technology?

I wonder how many people, as I did, found themselves thrown into confusion by the death last week of Jean Ichbiah (pictured), inventor of Ada.  Learning that the inventor of a computer programming language is already old enough to have lived 66 years (Ichbiah was 66 when he succumbed to brain cancer) is a little like learning that your 11-year-old daughter has grown up and left home or that the first car you ever bought no longer is legal because it runs on gasoline in an age where all automobiles must run on water. How can something as novel, as new, as a computing language possibly already be so old-fangled that an early practitioner like Ichbiah can already no longer be with us? The thought was so disquieting that it took me immediately back to the last time I wrote about Ichbiah, and indeed about Ada Lovelace for whom his language was named. It was in the context ... (more)